Archive for August, 2020

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The Newseum

On this bike ride I stopped by the Newseum building, located at 555 Pennsylvania Avenue (MAP) in northwest D.C.’s Downtown neighborhood.  But that’s not anything new.  I have done that hundreds of times before over the years.  That’s because the Newseum had an exhibit entitled “Today’s Front Pages Gallery,” in which it displayed the front pages of dozens of newspapers along the front of its building each day so that passersby on the sidewalk could stop and read them.  So I used to frequently stop and read the headlines and a story or two.  Also, being able to see all the different newspapers together is something I’ve always found it interesting because of how different newspapers from different parts of the country, as well as foreign newspapers, cover the same story so differently.  For example, the way the different newspapers reported the election of Donald Trump in November of 2016 were vastly different.  Similarly, the coverage of the killing of Osama Bin Laden back in 2011 was covered quite differently by different newspapers, especially foreign ones.

After today’s visit, however, I decided it was about time I wrote about it.  I figured if I don’t write about it now, it might soon be too late.  Because the building will soon be known by another name.  Sadly, The Newseum is closed.  And not just temporarily because of the pandemic.  Last December, citing financial difficulties, the Newseum closed down permanently.  However, on May 15, 2020, the Newseum began searching for a new location.  So while the building, purchased by Johns Hopkins University for $372.5 million, will change, hopefully the Newseum won’t when it opens in its new location, wherever that turns out to be.

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D.C. Jazz Heroes Mural

During this bike ride, as I was leisurely riding around in D.C.’s Shaw neighborhood, I stopped to admire the mural on the side of the Right Proper Brewery, located at 624 T Street (MAP) next to The Howard Theatre.  Sadly, the brew pub was not yet open for the day.  But the mural made the ride worthwhile nonetheless.

As I would find out later, the mural is entitled D.C. Jazz Heroes, and was created in 2017 by artists Kate Decicco and Rose Jaffe with the sponsorship of Murals DC and the D.C. Commission on Arts and Humanities.  The colorful and vibrant mural combines painted wood cutouts on the painted brick wall, and features some of the significant jazz musicians who have shaped both the past and present of the city’s jazz scene.

In the piece Duke Ellington is pictured as a mentee – learning from the local jazz heroes Mahalia Jackson, Billy Taylor, Shirley Horn, Ron Holloway, Meshell Ndegeocello and Davey Yarborough.  The various musicians are depicted singing, or playing a piano, guitar, flute, and saxophone.  Interestingly, the mural is in the former location of Frank Holliday’s pool room, where future jazz great Duke Ellington spent much of his youth.

Sometimes researching what I saw on a bike ride is almost as interesting and fun as seeing it.  That was the case for this mural. And what I found out was that the artists behind the mural are particularly interesting.

Kate Decicco was previously based in D.C., but has sincere relocated to Oakland.  And murals have become a cornerstone of her practice, although she continues to have a multi-dimensional approach to her art.  She has said her work is “driven by [her] interests in equity, mental health, humor, community building and of course a passion for the activity of art-making.”  In addition to murals, she also participates in making art with people in locked spaces like mental institutions, prisons and juvenile detention centers.  She also works with young people.  But beyond just fostering their creative and artistic development, she sees arts education as a tool for coping, improving self-esteem, developing confidence and connection for those young people.  Decicco sums up her artistic approach and process by stating, “Any chance I have to support another person to discover their inherent creativity and the joy of making something with their hands brings me great satisfaction.”

Rose Jaffe remains local and loyal to D.C., and without any shade to Kate Decicco’s decision to relocate, she says, “I love D.C. and I think that we need artists to stay here.”  In addition to murals, her prolific career also specializes in ceramics and paintings while working in her Petworth studio.  But her studio provides her with more than just a space to work on her art.  She has sectioned off a large part of her studio and uses it as an events space.  This portion of her studio, which calls The Stew, has become an all inclusive art gallery, yoga studio, Zine workshop and whatever else she wants it to be.  And it is through both public and private events and get togethers at The Stew that she supports the local art scene and provides a space that can foster discussion about art.

Both Decicco and Jaffe purposefully connect with other people, both through their art, and the processes by which they create their art.  And I find that just as interesting as the mural they created together.

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The FBI Academy

On this weekend bike outing I went to the Marine Corps Base Quantico, on the grounds of which the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI’s) Training Academy is located.  Situated on 385 acres of woodlands approximately 36 miles south of D.C. near the town of Quantico in Stafford County, Virginia (MAP), the FBI Academy is a full-service national training facility, with: classrooms and conference rooms; dormitories; indoor and outdoor firing ranges; a gym and aquatic pool; a library; a dining hall; the Tactical and Emergency Vehicle Operations Center, which teaches safe, efficient driving techniques to FBI and Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) personnel and other government and military personnel, and; Hogan’s Alley, a training complex simulating a small town for carrying out practical exercises and training.

The FBI Academy was first opened in 1972, the year in which J. Edgar Hoover, the man who was instrumental in founding the FBI in 1935, became its first Director, and then lead the organization for the next 37 years.  The Academy is operated by the Bureau’s Training Division, and was initially where new FBI Special Agents received their first training after being hired. One of the many changes after the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001 was the development of additional and specialized training for Intelligence Analysts.  Over time the training of FBI Special Agents and Intelligence Analysts became integrated into an expansive integrated curriculum currently known as the Basic Field Training Course (BFTC).

The BFTC was developed by the Training Division to meet the Bureau’s ambitious goal of training new Agent and Intelligence Analyst candidates in a way that prepares them for their collaborative work in the field.  Previously, Agents and Analysts had completely separate training.  The BFTC replaced these two distinctly separate programs with an integrated, collaborative course that uses a dedicated field office team approach mirroring the environment that they will experience in their field assignments.

And although new Agents are still typically synonymous with the FBI Academy, the Training Division also instructs many other diverse groups of people.  In addition to Intelligence Analysts, those who currently receive training at the Academy include: people in a wide variety of professional staff positions at the FBI; law enforcement officers from other Federal agencies as well as state, local and tribal police and law enforcement entities, and; appropriate individuals from the private sector.  Elite units such as the Hostage Rescue Team, Evidence Response Teams, Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT), and law enforcement leaders from across the world also attend the Academy and utilize its training facilities to improve on skills.

In addition to the Training Division, the Academy grounds are also host to a number of other divisions and entities.  They include the Hostage Rescue Team Complex, the Operational Technology Division and its engineering research facility, the FBI Laboratory, the Forensic Science Research and Training Center, and the DEA’s Justice Training Center.

This ride was longer and different, but just as interesting as the shorter rides I used to take during my daily lunch break at work in D.C.  And it’s this kind of ride that I hope to take often now that I’m retired.

 

[Click on the photos to view the full-size versions]

1.  Hoover Road, named after the FBI’s founding and long-time Director, J. Edgar Hoover.
2.  A sign at the East Gate Security Entrance, which is the main entrance to the FBI Academy.
3.  The Academy’s Jefferson Building,which houses administrative offices and the student check-in and visitors center.
4.  A view from a distance of the Madison Dormitory building.
5. The intersection of route MCB-4 and J. Edgar Hoover Road, near the west gate entrance to the FBI Academy
6.  The sign at the West Gate Security Entrance to the FBI Academy
7.  Welcome sign at the entrance to the mock town named Hogan’s Alley
8.  Mock businesses, including a laundromat and pool hall, in Hogan’s Alley.  Interestingly, the outsides of the buildings in Hogan’s Alley simulate a small town for carrying out practical exercises and training. But the insides contain offices for Training Division personnel.
9.  A mock movie theater in Hogan’s Alley named The Biograph, named and modelled  after the theater in Chicago where FBI Agents attempted to arrest but ended up
killing gangster John Dillinger on July 22, 1934
10.  The Firearms Training Support Facility building that houses the Training Division’s Firearms Training Unit
11.  One of several outdoor firing ranges
12.  The indoor firing range

NOTE:  Due to security concerns there is currently very limited public access to Marine Corps Base Quantico and no public access to the FBI Academy grounds or facilities.

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Statue of Taras Shevchenko

In addition to numerous statues that pay homage to famous Americans, D.C. is also home to many that honor foreign heroes.  Some examples I’ve already visited are well-known, such as The Nelson Mandela Statue in Front of the South African Embassy and the Statue of Sir Winston Churchill.  Many others are less well-known, such as the Statue of Crown Princess Märtha, the Statue of Elefthérios Venizélos, and the Statue of Brigadier General Thaddeus Kościuszko.  But I haven’t yet visited many of the city’s hundreds, if not thousands of these statues.  And I think I better start prioritizing them during my bike rides so I can see them before angry mobs of rioters eventually tear them all down.

On this bike ride, I saw one of these statues that I hadn’t visited before – the Taras Shevchenko Memorial, which is located in the 2200 block of P Street (MAP) in northwest D.C.’s DuPont Circle neighborhood.  It is the 83rd statue to be profiled in this blog.

Taras Hryhorovych Shevchenko was a Ukrainian poet, writer, artist, public and political figure, as well as folklorist and ethnographer.  His literary heritage is regarded to be the foundation of modern Ukrainian literature and, to a large extent, the modern Ukrainian language. Shevchenko is also known for many masterpieces as a painter and an illustrator.

The idea of a U.S. monument honoring Shevchenko began with the American Shevchenko Society, founded in 1898. The society did not achieve its goal of erecting a monument, but the idea did not die out, and many Ukrainian-Americans continued to pursue the creation of a Shevchenko monument.

The inscriptions on the memorial best describe the man and the reasons for the statue.  The inscription on north face of statue base reads:

Dedicated to the Liberation, Freedom and Independence of all Captive Nations

This monument of Taras Shevchenko, 19th century Ukrainian poet and fighter for the independence of Ukraine and the freedom of all mankind, who under foreign Russian imperialist tyranny and colonial rule appealed for “The New and Righteous Law of Washington,” was unveiled on June 27, 1964. This historic event commemorated the 150th anniversary of Shevchenko’s birth. The memorial was authorized by the 86th Congress of the United States of America on August 31, 1960, and signed into Public Law 86-749 by Dwight D. Eisenhower, the 34th President of the United States of America on September 13, 1960. The statue was erected by Americans of Ukrainian ancestry and friends.

And an inscription on reverse face of the relief sculpture of Prometheus reads:

“…Our soul shall never perish. Freedom knows no dying.
And the greedy cannot harvest
fields where seas are lying.”

“Cannot bind the living Spirit
nor the living Word.
“Cannot smirch the sacred glory
of Th’Almighty Lord.”

 

[Click on the thumbnails above to view the full size photos]

NOTE:  A second Ukrainian monument was approved by the U.S. Congress in 2006.  The monument honors the millions of Ukrainians who died as a result of the 1932–1933 Holodomor, a famine-genocide caused by the Soviet Union.  The memorial site is located on a triangular lot on Massachusetts Avenue near Union Station.  On December 2, 2008, a dedication ceremony was held at the future site for the Holodomor Memorial, with Ukraine’s then-First Lady Kateryna Yushchenko among the speakers.  Formally dedicated on November 7, 2015, it is also the second memorial in D.C. to honor victims of Communism, the other being the Victims of Communism Memorial, also located near Union Station.

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Barcroft Park

On this bike ride I went back to Virginia and rode on the Four-Mile Run Trail, which can be accessed from the Mount Vernon Trail just south of Reagan National Airport.  Instead of the north section that meets up with the Washington and Old Dominion (W&OD) Trail, I stayed on the south end of the trail.  That portion of the trail goes through Barcroft Park, which is located at 4200 South Four Mile Run Drive in Arlington (MAP), and is adjacent to the Barcroft Sports & Fitness Center.  I’ve lived in Arlington in the past, and even been to the area where the park is located – but I unfortunately didn’t know about it back then.

Barcroft Park is a 65-acre public park featuring a baseball field, a softball field, batting cages, basketball courts, a sheltered picnic area, charcoal grills and playgrounds, a stream for fishing, and excellent bike and walking trails with ample shade for warm sunny days.

The park’s baseball venue, known officially as Tucker Field at Barcroft Park Field #6, is home to the George Washington University Colonials baseball team of the NCAA Division I Atlantic 10 Conference. The field holds a capacity of 500 spectators, and includes a new turf field laid in 2019 by FieldTurf, bullpens, enclosed dugouts, stadium seating, concessions, lights, a scoreboard, and a pressbox.

Also located within Barcroft Park is the Phoenix Bike Shop.  In March 2007, Phoenix Bikes opened its doors in Barcroft Park as a nonprofit organization. Phoenix Bike’s mission is to empower youth to become social entrepreneurs through direct participation in a financially and environmentally sustainable nonprofit bike shop that serves the community. Their vision is to provide a fun, safe, and challenging environment for local youth through building & running a great community bike shop. They believe this is a unique way for young leaders to learn teamwork, explore social entrepreneurship, develop business and leadership skills, and serve others.

It’s a great park with an excellent trail, and is easily accessible from D.C. by bike  And there are so many things to do there that you won’t become bored even if you have the luxury of being able to spend the entire day there like you would if you’re a recent retiree like me.  The park is open daily from sunrise until 11:00 p.m., and if you’re not going there via bike there is ample parking available as well.

[Click on the photos above to view the full size versions]