Archive for the ‘Miscellaneous’ Category

Yesterday was National Cancer Survivors Day. And to celebrate I signed up for the Great Cycling Challenge (GCC). Let me explain.

The concept of the GCC is simple. Participants set a personal riding goal for the month of June, and then get people to sponsor them. And all of the money raised from the sponsors goes toward fighting childhood cancers.

As it states on the front page of this blog, I’m not a fanatical cyclist. I’m just a guy who goes for bike rides. I use my lunch break each day at work, or occasionally on a weekend day off, to go for a ride and discover some of the interesting sites and events in and around D.C. I then write about it in this blog.

But I am now committed to some bike riding that is a little different than my norm. I have pledged to ride 250 miles during my lunchtime tides this month. That puts me on a pace to ride a cumulative distance during this year’s lunchtime bike rides equal to the distance between New York City and Los Angeles.

As a cancer survivor myself I know how scary and difficult such a diagnosis can be. But I was diagnosed as an adult. I can’t begin to imagine how much more scary and difficult it is for children. And despite being a parent, I can’t imagine what it is like for the parents of a diagnosed child. I love my children more than my own life and would rather have cancer myself than see one of my children diagnosed.

Currently, cancer is the biggest killer of children from disease in the United States. Over 15,700 children are diagnosed every year. And tragically, 38 children die of cancer every week.

So I signed up for the GCC to raise money to help these kids and their parents fight back, and to support The Children’s Cancer Research Fund in continuing their work to develop lifesaving treatments and find cures for childhood cancers. And I’m asking you to please go to my personal GCC page and sign up to be one of my sponsors.

I know there are lots of charity options, as well as bills to pay and other demands on your finances. So any amount you can give will be appreciated. All you have to do is go to my GCC personal page, or click on the logo at the top of this post, to donate using a credit card or PayPal. And like the lack of a minimum or maximum number of miles participants can ride, there is no minimum or maximum to the donations.

Anything you can give will help keep me motivated. But more importantly, it will help the kids. And I can’t think of a better was to celebrate being cancer free than do something to help kids with cancer.

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Walking a Labyrinth for World Labyrinth Day

Starting in 2009, The Labyrinth Society designated the first Saturday in May, which this year falls on May 5th, as World Labyrinth Day.  And although that is not until tomorrow, during today’s bike ride I decided to stop and walk the labyrinth located in the sanctuary of The Church of The Epiphany, which is open to the public Monday through Friday from 10:00am until 3:00pm.

At different times, the practice of walking a labyrinth has been associated with pilgrimages and pagan rituals.  More recently however, labyrinths have popped up in modern spirituality for contemplation and as prayer.  People walk a labyrinth for as many reasons as the number of people who walk one, including centering, feeling grounded, as prayer, as meditation, or as a great way to just unwind and clear your mind.

If you would like to walk a labyrinth tomorrow to celebrate World Labyrinth Day, there are nine labyrinths here in D.C., and more than a dozen more now exist within a ten-mile radius of the city.  Of these, there are at least a half a dozen outdoor labyrinths that are open to the public, and most are open daily from sunrise to sunset or shortly thereafter.

One of a few local labyrinths located outdoors and available to the public, the Georgetown Waterfront Park Labyrinth provides a means to walk a labyrinth in a scenic location.  It is located at the southern end of 33rd Street (MAP) in northwest D.C.’s Georgetown neighborhood.

The American Psychological Association also has a labyrinth on the green rooftop of their building at 10 G Street (MAP), near Union Station in northeast D.C.’s NoMa neighborhood.  The 42-foot labyrinth features trellises, plantings, tables, a journal, and a finger labyrinth that you can “walk” with your fingers—a good option for those with ambulatory issues. It is open Monday through Friday from 7:00am to 7:00pm.  You can sign in at the building’s security desk to go up to the roof, or call Holly Siprelle (202-336-5519) to arrange a guided walk.

There is also an outdoor labyrinth that is available to the public at Barton Park, located across the river at the corner of North Barton and 10th Streets (MAP) in Arlington, Virginia.  Originally part of the former Northern Virginia Whitman-Walker Clinic’s healing garden, the 37-foot labyrinth of precast stone and pavers went into storage when that branch of the clinic closed.  It was later moved to Barton Park in late 2013.

Set among old pines and other trees, St. Aidan’s Episcopal Church in Alexandria, Virginia, also has a public labyrinth.  Located at 8531 Riverside Road (MAP), the 40-foot labyrinth is made of rubber mulch with white stones outlining the path and is set near a memorial garden with benches. At the nearby Art at the Center, parishioner Kathryn Horn Coneway offers workshops on making finger labyrinths from clay.

The city of Bethesda’s St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, located at 6030 Grosvenor Lane (MAP), has a 62-foot labyrinth made from turf and pavers, as well as a 36-by-36-inch Plexiglas finger labyrinth, available to the public.  At this labyrinth, a journal to record your thoughts is available, and is located under the bench.

The University of Maryland’s Garden of Reflection and Remembrance, located at 7600 Baltimore Avenue in College Park (MAP), also has a labyrinth adjacent to the campus chapel. Guided walks, yoga sessions, and special events are regularly scheduled. Benches, trees, and water elements help visitors connect with nature.

If you want to walk a labyrinth, but these options are not readily available to you, I encourage you to find one that is.  To find others labyrinths here in the D.C. area, or anywhere else in the world, just use the Labyrinth Society’s online worldwide labyrinth locater.  And if there is not a labyrinth near you, there are also finger labyrinths now available as a smartphone app.  Just check the Google Store or iTunes.

         
[Click on the photos to view the full-size versions]

A Secret Entrance to the White House

Anyone who has been near the White House when the president or visiting dignitaries were arriving or departing have seen the entrances to the White House in use.  Equipped with security gates, ram-proof physical barriers, armed personnel, electronic surveillance equipment, and other unseen security measures, the entrances are obvious.  But there is another entrance to the White House that few people know about.

Located two blocks away from the White House in the 1500 block of H Street (MAP) in northwest D.C.’s Downtown neighborhood, the secret entrance to the White House looks like almost any other alley in the city.  Thousands and thousands of pedestrians and vehicles pass by it every day, and I doubt any of them know what is hiding in plain site right in front of them.   About the only thing that distinguishes it from any other alley is a small, unobtrusive booth built into the wall of the building on the right side of alley.  I imagine most people who see it assume the booth is for an attendant collecting money for a public parking lot at the other end of the alley.  But it is actually a bullet-proof enclosure manned by Secret Service agents.

The alley leads south past the back of the Federal Claims Courthouse Building, before ending in an unassuming doorway at the rear of Freedman’s Bank, formerly known as the Treasury Department annex, on Pennsylvania Avenue.   From there, according to archival newspaper reports from before security concerns prevented the publishing of such information, the passageway to the White House passes through two subterranean tunnels.

The first tunnel was constructed in 1919 when the Treasury Department Annex was built, presumably to protect the Treasury and its employees from being robbed of the vast sums of cash with which they worked.  The second tunnel was contracted for President Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II, and lead from the East Wing of the White House to the first Presidential bomb shelter.  The tunnel and bomb shelter were to be a secret throughout the war, but was disclosed to the public in December of 1941 when Congressman Clare E. Hoffman complained about its expense in an open debate in the House of Representatives.

In later years, the tunnel has been used by persons who needed to exit or depart the White House without public or press attention. President Richard Nixon’s daughter, Tricia Nixon, and her husband, Edward F. Cox, departed the White House via the tunnel after their 1972 Rose Garden wedding.  President Lyndon Johnson also used the tunnel to avoid Vietnam War protesters when departing the White House.  Other uses of the tunnel have either been discredited or, like the stories of Marilyn Monroe using a tunnel to sneak into the White House as part of an affair with President John F. Kennedy, remain unproven.

Once the alley and tunnels were connected to provide for vehicular access to the White House, the passageway was modified to end in the parking garage in the White House basement.  And despite the general public’s lack of knowledge of the access way, or perhaps because of it, it remains in use to this day.

1 20160311_141244     2 2016-03-21 14.55.17     3 2016-03-21 14.06.22

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[Click on the thumbnails above to view extremely high resolution photos]

Horticulturalists at the National Park Service are predicting that the cherry blossoms around the Tidal Basin here in D.C. will peak sometime between this coming weekend and the following Tuesday.  One of the methods by which they make this prediction is by gauging the stages of development of the buds on the indicator tree and then comparing that to the development of the buds on the other trees.

There are basically four stages of development for cherry blossoms before they reach their peak bloom.  The first stage is referred to as the green buds stage. This stage, when green color begins to be visible in the small brownish buds, usually occurs between late February and early March.  Cherry blossoms emerge before the leaves on the trees do, and the first sign of their impending arrival are green buds on the branches of the tree.

In the second stage of development florets begin to be visible as the buds slowly open.  This routinely occurs from early to mid March, and anywhere between 12 and 17 days before peak bloom.

The middle stage is referred to as peduncle elongation.  This may be my favorite stage for no other reason than just because of the name.  This is when the blooms grow stems and emerge outward from the buds.  When this stage occurs it is usually about 5 to 10 days until peak bloom.  However, this stage is very susceptible to weather, particularly frost, which can delay the process.

The last stage of development before peak bloom is referred to as puffy white.  This applies to all blossoms, regardless of color.  This averages between four and six days prior to peak bloom, and is characterized by the blooms begin to open up.

Finally, the tree’s peak bloom arrives.  How long the bloom last depends on how long they have been exposed to cold temperatures.  A warm spell in the 60s or 70s will produce blooms lasting four to five days, while colder temperatures could extend the blooming period so that it lasts between seven and 10 days.

Interestingly, during the blooming stage not all blossoms remain the same color.  Many are dark pink when in bud, lighter pink when they first blossom, and then eventually pale pink or white.  Others may open as a white flower and change color to pink over the course of a few days.

The entire blossom season is relatively short.  Full bloom, known as mankai in Japanese, is usually reached within about one week after the opening of the first blossoms, or kaika.  Another week later, the blooming peak is over and the blossoms are falling from the trees like snow from the sky.  Strong wind and rain or other adverse weather can cut the blooming season even shorter.  So don’t hesitate going.  If you do, you may be too late.

Note:  After enlarging it, see if you can find the photo-bomber in the photo for the Green Buds stage.

Best of the Rest – Part 5

Posted: December 29, 2017 in Miscellaneous, Photos

The Colonnade at The Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America

Today’s blog post is the fifth and last part of a series of my favorite miscellaneous photos from 2017 that have not been previously posted here on this blog.  Part 1Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4 of the series were previously posted.

 

[Click on the photos to view the full-size versions]

1 – A street vendor selling a purse featuring Barack and Michelle Obama.
2 – Various mushrooms for sale at the Vermont Avenue Farmers Market
3 – A pedicab parked off the beaten path for tourists on P Street in the Logan Circle neighborhood
4 – Savory Greek pastries for sale at the farmers market at the Reagan Building
5 – A purple flower on an cast iron fence on 14th Street in the Columbia Heights neighborhood in northwest D.C.
6 – A mural on the side of a grocery store features the store’s owner
7 – One of many signs of patriotism for Independence Day, this one in Georgetown
8 – The simplistic and elegant architectural lines of the colonnade at Federal Triangle
9 – Evergreens, although singular in color, rival the colorful flowers at the Botanic Garden for their beauty
10 – Autumn showing off it’s colors on Swann Street in the DuPont Circle neighborhood
11 – A complimentary smart car for use by guests at Attache Corporate Housing in Foggy Bottom
12 – A summer concert in the park as part of Farragut Fridays in Farragut Square Park
13 – A Metropolitan Police Department car parked in a bike lane as an officer inside eats her lunch
14 – A freshly-fallen colorful autumn leaf I watched fall in the yard of a residence on Capitol Hill
15 – Secret Service officers requiring a man to take down the encampment he built in Lafayette Square Park
16 – Marchers from Charlottesville vowed to occupy Farragut Square Park for six months but lasted only a few days
17 – One of the many summer concerts, this one in Franklin Square
18 – Stained glass windows at the church of presidents, St. John’s Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square
19 – A view from the north shore of the Potomac River looking toward Arlington
20 – An inflatable Hoya bulldog mascot in Red Square on the campus of Georgetown University
21 – Musicians in a tent performing in a temporary “Moroccan City” set up on the National Mall
22 – A woman wearing a pie hat at the annual handing out of free pie at McPherson Square
23 – Colorful balloons seemed to detract from this protest’s message
24 – My recumbent bike named Julius at the fountain at the
25 – An elderly homeless man with only one shoe but his own Bible at Street Church in Franklin Square
26 – The counter at another one of my favorite lunch spots, MGM Roast Beef in Brentwood
27 – Heirloom tomatoes at the USDA Outdoor Farmers Market
28 – Looking through the front window and watching the pizzas being prepared at We, The Pizza
29 – A window washer repelling down the side of The W Hotel  on 15th Street
30 – A bike designed more for the comfort of the passenger than the rider
31 – Colorful statues in front of pet bakery and grooming shop
32 – A giant chicken statue in the front yard of a house on R Street in northwest D.C.
33 – A seemingly distraught man near the fountain in DuPont Circle Park
34 – A topiary dog marking it’s territory at a residence on R Street in northwest D.C.
35 – Holiday vendors selling handmade items at Eastern Market just before Christmas
36 – A street artist’s wares on display on a sidewalk on Capitol Hill
37 – I thought all Holly berries were red, but now I’ve learned that they are not
38 – A window in City Center decorated for the holidays
39 – One of the grill masters of the Georgetown University Grilling Society
40 – A dinosaur hiding in the Hawaii room at the United States Botanic Garden
41 – The Tune Inn, my favorite “dive” on Capitol Hill and home of the Joe’s West Virginia sandwich
42 – The entrance to David’s Tent, where a non-stop worship service has been happening since September 11, 2015

Best of the Rest – Part 3

Posted: December 14, 2017 in Miscellaneous, Photos

The high-end residences known as The Warehouses at Union Row in the Shaw/Uptown neighborhood

Today’s blog post is part three of a five-part series of my favorite miscellaneous photos from the past year that have not been previously posted here on my blog.  Part 1 and Part 2 of the series were previously posted.  And please come back each Friday for the rest of this month for Part 4 and Part 5 of my year-end collection of miscellaneous photos from 2017.

 

[Click on the photos to view the full-size versions]

1 – The George Washington mural on U Street
2 – The base of the fountain at Meridian Hill Park
3 – A very bright red rose in the sunlight that caught my eye as I was riding by
4 – The fountain and soon to be outdoor ice rink at the National Sculpture Garden
5 – A reporter and cameraman on Pennsylvania Avenue across from the U.S. Department of Justice Building.
6 – A sign from times past on a building near Blagdon Avenue
7 – An encouraging mural on the back of Union Market
8 – A very colorful chair on the patio of a restaurant off 14th Street
9 – The modern symmetry of a downtown office building stands in stark contrast to other architecture
10 – Some mushrooms that look more like pancakes on the base of a tree on 13th Street
11 – Some samples of vegetables grown at the United States Botanic Garden
12 – Window washers scaling down the side of the National Press Club building
13 – A bench in Franklin Square Park decorated in memory of a homeless woman wo lived there
14 – A flower vendor outside of the Farragut Square North Metro Station
15 – A duck walking  down the sidewalk along the Southwest Waterfront near The Titanic Memorial
16 – A public artwork of a pink double-hump camel
17 – A piece of art outside near the front entrance to the Hirshorn Museum
18 – A street performer playing for tips in Farragut Square Park
19 – A man wearing an unusually geeky hat during the full solar eclipse
20 – A sticker on a Prius that reads “Cool Prius, Said Nobody”
21 – Police Officers outside FBI Headquarters arresting a man
22 – A large, colorful W in front of The W Hotel downtown on 15th Street
23 – Fresh vegetables for sale at the farmers market at the National Geographic headquarters building
24 – The Spirit of Washington sinner cruise ship travelling up the Washington Channel
25 – A Pabst Blue Ribbon mural on the side of a bar on U Street
26 – Protestors protesting in front of the White House about a variety of issues
27 – What’s left of a bike that was not securely locked in the Petworth neighborhood
28 – People lined up at a food truck parked with all the others along the streets bordering Farragut Square Park
29 – A hopefully friendly dog wearing a sign that says pet me tied up near Union Market
30 – The Southwest Waterfront just east of the redevelopment construction
31 – A window washing rig on the side of a building that seems to disappear into the sky
32 – A sculpture in the National Sculpture Garden
33 – A sign reading Resist Persist on the side of a building
34 – A bench in a shady spot in Lower Senate Park on Capitol Hill
35 – Flowers at Caruso’s Florist on Rhode Island Avenue near the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle
36 – The Smithsonian Institute, more commonly referred to as The Castle because of its appearance
37 – An American flag hanging from the National Broadcasters Association building
38 – Some tourists trying to take a photo of an uncooperative subject in the Mary Ripley Garden
39 – A cooking demonstration at the United States Botanic Garden using plants grown there
40 – More protestors in front of the White House because, well, there are protestors in front of the White House
41 – The statue of a cow randomly placed in a front yard
42 – One of my favorite lunch spots, MGM Roast Beef

Plant-Based D.C. Landmarks

Sadly, despite having worked in downtown D.C. for the past 30 years, I had never visited the United States Botanic Garden during the Christmas holiday season before this year.  I’ve been there many times but not during the holidays. But a friend who only lived here for a year before moving out of the area knew about the Botanic Garden’s annual holiday display, entitled Season’s Greenings, and the sights, smells, and sounds that accompany it.  When she asked me about this year’s display, it prompted me to go check it out.  And I’m so glad I did.

This year’s display is a multifaceted one that stretches throughout the Botanic Garden.  First, it includes the return of a series of D.C. landmarks made out of plant materials.  The holiday display also includes thousands of blooms throughout the Conservatory, from exotic orchids to a showcase of heirloom and newly developed poinsettia varieties in the seasonal Poinsettia Room.  Lastly, this year’s holiday decorations include a showcase of model trains chugging around, below, through, and above plant-based recreations of iconic sights and roadside attractions from across the United States.

I will be covering the Poinsettia display, and the model train and roadside attractions showcase in the near future.  Today’s blog post focuses on the collection of D.C. landmarks, all made from a myriad of plant and other natural materials, which is displayed in the Garden Court.  There are a dozen local landmarks and memorials on display this year.  The White House swing set, which had been included in previous years, was not present this year because the actual swing set is no longer at the White House.  In it’s place is the Albert Einstein Memorial.  Also new this year is the National Museum of African American History and Culture, which opened a little over a year ago.  All of the landmarks would be incredible in and of themselves.  But knowing that they are made of plants adds to the experience.

For added holiday cheer at the Botanic Garden, there are concerts on Tuesday and Thursday evenings in December, when hours are extended until 8pm.  If you can, I highly recommend going on one of these days for both the music and to see the exhibit and plant collections illuminated by colorful lights.  One of my first thoughts after seeing Seasons Greenings was wishing that I had known about it and gone in previous years.  So do yourself a favor and go so you don’t have the same thought years from now.

 

[Click on the photos above to view the full size versions]

1 – U.S. Capitol Building
2 – The Thomas Jefferson Memorial
3 – Library of Congress, Thomas Jefferson Building
4 – Lincoln Memorial
5 – National Museum of African American History and Culture
6 – National Museum of the American Indian
7 – Smithsonian Institution, The Castle
8 – U.S. Botanic Garden Conservatory
9 – U.S. Supreme Court
10 – Washington Monument
11 – White House
12 – Albert Einstein Memorial

NOTE:  My blog post on “Seasons Greetings: Railroads and Roadside Attractions” will appear next Monday.

Best of the Rest – Part 2

Posted: December 8, 2017 in Miscellaneous, Photos

Rainbows on the National Mall

Today’s blog post is part two of a five-part series of my favorite miscellaneous photos from the past year that have not been previously posted here on my blog.  Part one of the series was posted last Friday and can be found here.  And please come back each Friday for the rest of this month for Part 3, Part 4 and Part 5 of my year-end collection of miscellaneous photos from 2017.

 

[Click on the photos to view the full-size versions]

1 – A young woman playing the violin for tips in front of the U.S. Treasury Building
2 – Public art pieces being transported to the median on New York Avenue
3 – Mushrooms growing on a tree stump on the sidewalk median along 14th Street in northwest D.C.
4 – Some children playing on a modern playground jungle gym while a couple others play on the fence
5 – A group tour traveling via Segway passing by the north portico of the White House
6 – A well-travelled Jeep displays the history of its travel and its owner
7 – The future headstone at Historic Congressional Cemetery of 70-year old music lover Joyce E. Palmer
8 – An abandoned, graffiti–covered house on Rhode Island Avenue
9 – Yayoi Kusama’s pumpkin sculpture at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
10 – The Acanthus fountain in the Mary Livingston Ripley Garden
11 – A view from the Georgetown Waterfront of Arlington and the Key Bridge
12 – A mommy/baby yoga and exercise class at Union Market
13 – Flowers growing along a cast iron fence at a residence on Capitol Hill
14 – A military service at the United States Navy Memorial
15 – A homemade sign hanging from a rowhouse in the Shaw neighborhood
16 – A colorful florist shop on O Street in Georgetown
17 – Greek pastries and baked goods for sale at the Reagan Building Farmers Market
18 – A fence made of rope along the waterfront in Old Town Alexandria
19 – A lone rower practicing on the Potomac River near the Kennedy Center
20 – Beachballs celebrating summer suspended over the walkway at City Center
21 – A man sitting on a bench in Adams Morgan wearing a chapeau that caught my eye
22 – These lions guard the entrance to a restaurant on Pennsylvania Avenue
23 – A retired military jet on display at the D.C. Armory
24 – An nostalgic-looking electric street car on H Street
25 – A street musician playing in the middle of the Vermont Avenue Farmers Market
26 – Fireworks for sale at the district line with Maryland
27 – A couple of young women playing Giant Jenga in Farragut Square Park during Farragut Fridays
28 –The New York Avenue Presbyterian Church where President Lincoln worshipped while in office
29 – The protected bike lane on First Street is one of the best bike routes in the city
30 – A mural on Lanier Place by Juan Pineda entitled “A People Without Murals is a Demuralized People”
31 – A pig roasting at the Vermont Avenue Farmers Market
32 – Protestors in Lafayette Square in front of the White House
33 – A sign seen in a shop window at the Artswalk in Brentwood
34 – A mural by an unknown artist at the intersection of Florida and North Capitol Streets
35 – A Little Free Library in northwest D.C.’s Petworth neighborhood
36 – A walking/hiking path on Kingman Island
37 – Some industrial signs along the Metropolitan Branch Trail
38 – A police officer sitting in a squad car updating his Facebook page while parked in the bike lane on G Street
39 – A ghost bike tribute on U Street in northwest D.C.
40 – A unusual looking Subway Sandwich Shop near Union Market
41 – A decorated minivan that probably does not belong to your typical soccer mom
42 – A public art piece located in a park

Sunbeams shining through the autumn leaves of a tree in front of Healey Hall on the campus of Georgetown University

As the month of December begins and another year is rapidly coming to an end I find myself, much like I did last year, with a number of miscellaneous photos I took during my daily lunchtime bike rides over the past twelve months, but did not previously post in this blog. The photos depict many different aspects of D.C., but do not capture what you would call a main character in the story of the city.  Instead, the photos capture the periphery, background, and supporting characters that round out its overall story.

I find myself with so many photos that I have decided to post some of them each Friday throughout the month of December.  In fact, I’ve decided to post a photo for each workday of the past year.  As a career Federal employee, after deducting for holidays, sick days and annual leave, that comes to 210 photos for 2017.  So today, and each day for the rest of this week, I am going to post some of my favorite photos.  And at the top of each of this week’s five posts I will post my top five favorite photos.

I hope you enjoy these photos and find them interesting. And please click on the cropped thumbnails to view the full size versions and additional detail.  And as always, I invite you to comment and/or ask questions. So feel free to do so on a post, or on individual photos after clicking on them.  You’re also welcome to contact me privately if you’d prefer.  I’m interested in your perspective and value your input.

 

[Click on the photos above to view the full size versions]

1 – The cobblestones and street car tracks on O Street in Georgetown
2 – Street Church in Franklin Square Park sponsored by Church of the Epiphany
3 – One of the many murals along the Metropolitan Branch Trail
4 – Art bench on display outside of the 8th Street Art Co-op in the Brentwood neighborhood
5 – The unusual architecture of the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization
6 – A young woman sitting on a bench and playing a ukulele while waiting for a bus
7 – Construction site with preserved building façade on U Street next to the Howard Theater
8 – An abstract mural of Yoda painted on garage door in an alley in the NoMa neighborhood
9 – My recumbent bike, Julius, in front of an outdoor fountain at the National Gallery of Art
10 – Cityscape of the Rosslyn area of Arlington from across the Potomac River
11 – Man riding backwards on a bicycle on Pennsylvania Avenue near Freedom Plaza
12 – Spiral bike rack viewed from one end outside of the Farragut North Metro Station
13 – Church building at the Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America
14 – Blooming toad lilies at the Smithsonian’s Mary Livingston Ripley Garden
15 – Illuminated stained glass windows at St. John’s Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square
16 – A selection of fresh shrimp for sale at the Maine Avenue Fish Market
17 – Excavation at a construction site near H Street as viewed from the Metropolitan Branch Trail
18 – Pabst Blue Ribbon mural on side of Solly’s Tavern
19 – Virginia Rail Express train crossing an overpass over 7th Street in southeast D.C.
20 – A Kurdistan protest outside of the Trump International Hotel
21 – An antique motorcycle and sidecar outside of Union Market
22 – A Friday tradition, a round burger from The Georgetown University Grilling Society (GUGS)
23 – Part of the revitalized watershed along the Anacostia River
24 – The U.S. Capitol Building rotunda in my bike’s rear view mirror
25 – A rope walker practicing in Red Square on the campus of Georgetown University
26 – A news crew broadcasting live from outside of the FBI Headquarters building
27 – Shoppers in a rare uncrowded moment in Eastern Market on Capitol Hill
28 – A pair of street musicians playing for tips outside of the Farragut North Metro Station
29 – A ramp for ducks to access the fountain at the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden
30 – Free popsicle giveaway during “Farragut Fridays” at Farragut Square Park
31 – This Dead End sign caught my attention because of the question mark
32 – Fresh eggplants and corn on the cob at the Vermont Avenue Farmers Market
33 – Tourists taking a photo near the National Mall downtown
34 – A city resident allowed out relaxing in front of his cage on his front porch
35 – A protest against President Trump in front of the Trump International Hotel
36 – A display in front of a middle eastern rug store on 7th Street on Capitol Hill
37 – A street evangelist singing in front of the General William Tecumseh Sherman Monument
38 – A protest by anarchists occupying Pershing Park
39 – A cast iron fence in front of a residence in Georgetown
40 – A sidewalk sign in front of a wine shop on Connecticut Avenue near DuPont Circle
41 – The East Potomac Driving Range at the Washington Golf Center
42 – The daily selection of doughnuts at Astro Doughnuts and Fried Chicken

NOTE:  Please come back each Friday through the rest of the month for Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 and
Part 5 of my year-end collection of miscellaneous photos from 2017.

Police Public Relations

Posted: September 11, 2017 in Miscellaneous

Police Public Relations

I don’t know how to get in contact with her at this point, so I’d like to use this blog post to take the opportunity to thank the police officer driving patrol car #2084 from the 2nd District of the Washington Metropolitan Police Department.  Police officers have to make many important decisions on a daily basis.  So your decision that the convenience of parking in the bike lane in the 1600 block of L Street while you ate your lunch outweighed the potential danger to the many cyclists who had to merge out of the lane and into vehicle traffic to get past you must have been a difficult one to make.  

Oh, I’d also like you to know that I think the sarcastic comments you made through her vehicle’s loudspeaker when you saw me take the photo were a particularly classy touch.  And you have no reason to fear your comments went unnoticed.  I heard you, as did more than a hundred other nearby pedestrians who were part of the busy downtown lunch crowd. 

So continue to represent your department and profession in all you do.  It doesn’t go unnoticed.