Posts Tagged ‘Kate Decicco’

JazzMural01

D.C. Jazz Heroes Mural

During this bike ride, as I was leisurely riding around in D.C.’s Shaw neighborhood, I stopped to admire the mural on the side of the Right Proper Brewery, located at 624 T Street (MAP) next to The Howard Theatre.  Sadly, the brew pub was not yet open for the day.  But the mural made the ride worthwhile nonetheless.

As I would find out later, the mural is entitled D.C. Jazz Heroes, and was created in 2017 by artists Kate Decicco and Rose Jaffe with the sponsorship of Murals DC and the D.C. Commission on Arts and Humanities.  The colorful and vibrant mural combines painted wood cutouts on the painted brick wall, and features some of the significant jazz musicians who have shaped both the past and present of the city’s jazz scene.

In the piece Duke Ellington is pictured as a mentee – learning from the local jazz heroes Mahalia Jackson, Billy Taylor, Shirley Horn, Ron Holloway, Meshell Ndegeocello and Davey Yarborough.  The various musicians are depicted singing, or playing a piano, guitar, flute, and saxophone.  Interestingly, the mural is in the former location of Frank Holliday’s pool room, where future jazz great Duke Ellington spent much of his youth.

Sometimes researching what I saw on a bike ride is almost as interesting and fun as seeing it.  That was the case for this mural. And what I found out was that the artists behind the mural are particularly interesting.

Kate Decicco was previously based in D.C., but has sincere relocated to Oakland.  And murals have become a cornerstone of her practice, although she continues to have a multi-dimensional approach to her art.  She has said her work is “driven by [her] interests in equity, mental health, humor, community building and of course a passion for the activity of art-making.”  In addition to murals, she also participates in making art with people in locked spaces like mental institutions, prisons and juvenile detention centers.  She also works with young people.  But beyond just fostering their creative and artistic development, she sees arts education as a tool for coping, improving self-esteem, developing confidence and connection for those young people.  Decicco sums up her artistic approach and process by stating, “Any chance I have to support another person to discover their inherent creativity and the joy of making something with their hands brings me great satisfaction.”

Rose Jaffe remains local and loyal to D.C., and without any shade to Kate Decicco’s decision to relocate, she says, “I love D.C. and I think that we need artists to stay here.”  In addition to murals, her prolific career also specializes in ceramics and paintings while working in her Petworth studio.  But her studio provides her with more than just a space to work on her art.  She has sectioned off a large part of her studio and uses it as an events space.  This portion of her studio, which calls The Stew, has become an all inclusive art gallery, yoga studio, Zine workshop and whatever else she wants it to be.  And it is through both public and private events and get togethers at The Stew that she supports the local art scene and provides a space that can foster discussion about art.

Both Decicco and Jaffe purposefully connect with other people, both through their art, and the processes by which they create their art.  And I find that just as interesting as the mural they created together.