Archive for the ‘Gardens’ Category

Paradise In Pots

During today’s lunchtime bike ride I stopped to take a break at the Enid Haupt Garden, located just behind the Smithsonian Castle, just off the National Mall at 1000 Jefferson Drive (MAP).  As I was entering the grounds I saw a sign for an outdoor potted plant exhibit located on the garden’s western patio entitled Paradise In Pots.  The exhibit included hundreds of tropical and warm weather plants, most of which are currently in bloom despite the increasingly cooler autumn temperatures.

The exhibit is only temporary, however, because they will have to take the plants in before the really cold weather arrives.  When they take the plants in, they will be taken back to an off-site facility in Suitland, Maryland.  The facility, known as the Smithsonian Gardens Greenhouse Complex, actually includes fourteen greenhouses and serves as the production and maintenance facility for thousands of seasonal plants that are displayed in gardens, grounds, and indoor and outdoor horticultural exhibits throughout the Smithsonian Institution museums and properties.  The Suitland complex also houses the Smithsonian Orchid Collection, tropical plant specimens, interior display plants, and thousands of annuals, perennials, trees and shrubs, plus hundreds of poinsettias and other holiday plants.  They grow the nectar plants as well for the Butterfly Pavilion at the National Museum of Natural History.

So the next time you step outside your office or visit the museums downtown, take notice of all the plants – inside and outside the buildings. It is most likely that every one of them came from your newest neighbors on the Suitland Campus; the staff at the Greenhouse Nursery Branch!

         

         

         

         

         

         

              

    
[Click on the photos to view the full-size versions]

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Titan Arum

Three corpse flowers (Amorphophallus titanium), also known as titan arum or the stinky plant, are currently in the process of blooming at The United States Botanic Garden on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol Building here in D.C.  I have been stopping by daily for the past couple of weeks to monitor their progress.  But on today’s bike ride I was pleased to see that the largest of the three plants is now in full bloom.  Peak blooms for the second and third plants are currently predicted to be between tomorrow and August 30th.

The three plants currently on display, which vary in age from five years up to 12 years old, have never bloomed before.  And this appears to be the first time in North America that an institution has three corpse flower plants all blooming at the same time.

For more information about corpse flowers in general, please see my blog post about the most recent previous bloom at the Botanic Garden, which occurred in 2016.

         

    
[Click on the photos to view the full-size versions]

Nature’s Fireworks

Posted: July 5, 2017 in Gardens, Miscellaneous

Nature’s Fireworks

I took this photograph recently near the Smithsonian American History Museum on the National Mall.  I entitled it “Nature’s Fireworks” because for me it brought to mind fireworks shows like the one that took place in D.C. last night.  I hope everyone had a happy and safe Independence Day.

May Flowers

There’s an old saying that goes “April showers bring May flowers.”  Actually, the entire proverb goes something like, “March winds and April showers bring May flowers and June bugs.”  It is a lesson in patience.  It means that a period of discomfort can provide the basis for a period of happiness and joy.

Well, I can do without the early cold winds, and June bugs that come later on.  And I’m not all that fond of the rain either.  But I guess the traditionally rainy period in April is necessary to provide the water that nourishes the plants and allows them to subsequently bloom.  And based on the beauty and magnificence of many of the flowers I saw during my lunchtime bike rides during the past month, I’d say this year’s rains were well worth enduring.

As I rode around in some of the city’s various residential neighborhoods, a number of flowers and plants and private gardens caught my eye.  Some were at homes which are very large, and clearly belong to more affluent people.  Some of those homes are even on the National Register of Historic Places.  Others were located on the property of more modest houses.  A few were actually from abandoned properties.  And I even saw some plants and flowers in medians in the road,  or in plantings outside of small, local businesses.

Unlike the early season wildflower blooms I recently saw on a ride to the Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge earlier this month, all of these flowers were purposefully planted by the property owners.  And none were from places in D.C. where you would normally expect to find such beautiful blooms, such as the United States Botanic Garden Conservatory, the Smithsonian’s Enid A. Haupt Garden, or other similar places.

The photographs in this blog post are some of the ones I took during the month of May.  And I took a lot of photos in the last month.  There are one hundred photos included in this post.  I chose them based on the photo itself, and not just the flower in it.  But I also tried to include photos of a variety of flowers so as to show the diversity and beauty of the gardens and grounds of many of this city’s homes.

I’d also like to remind you, however, that I am not a professional photographer and I do not have a fancy camera.  These photos, like all the ones in this blog, were taken with my cell phone.  I think they turned out fairly well though.  So be sure to click on the thumbnails for the larger versions so you can see the intricacy, complexity and the full beauty of the flowers.  And I hope you enjoy these photographs as much as I enjoyed riding around and taking them.

         

          

         

         

          

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

          

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         
[Click on the thumbnails above to view the full size photos]

Early Season Wildflower Blooms

They are predicting a 70 to 90 percent chance of rain every day for the coming week.  And although it was slightly overcast yesterday, the weather was cool and dry.  So I decided to go for a late afternoon weekend bike ride to the Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, which is located approximately 25 miles due south of D.C., at 13950 Dawson Beach Road (MAP), where the Occoquan River meets the Potomac River in Prince William County, Virginia .

Having been there before, it occurred to me as I was initially riding through the refuge that there was very little color compared to the last time I was there.  This is evidenced by the above photo.  The green has returned with the Spring.  But most of the other colors have yet to follow because many of the larger blooming plants do not peak until later in the summer.  But as I continued riding I looked more closely and was intermittently able to find a variety of color in small flowers and leaves along the way.

The small size of the blooms gave me the chance to practice some selective focus photography. Unfortunately, despite my best efforts as shown in the photos below, there is no type of photography can capture their true beauty.  For that I recommend you get out there and see it for yourself.

The whole experience reminded me of how there is always beauty all around you.  It’s just that sometimes it’s not obvious.  Sometimes you have to look for it to find it.

          

         

         

         

         

         

         

         
[Click on the thumbnails above to view the full size photos]

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A September 11th Memorial Grove

On today’s lunchtime bike ride I chose to ride to a local September 11th memorial.  On past anniversaries of the terrorist attacks on the Pentagon, the World Trade Center in New York, and United Flight 93 which crashed in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, I have observed the occasion by riding to memorials to those killed on that day.  I have been to the National 9/11 Memorial at the Pentagon, as well as The Victims of the Terrorist Attack on The Pentagon Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery.  But the anniversary this year falls on a weekend.  So on today’s ride to end the workweek I rode to one of a number of local memorials here in D.C. – the September 11th Memorial Grove, located in Historic Congressional Cemetery (MAP).

Within the cemetery, the grove is configured as an alley, originating across from the gravesite of John Phillip Sousa and continuing southward down a hill to the far edge of the cemetery near the Anacostia River. Because the Sousa grave is the most visited area of the cemetery, the grove draws people in and leads them on a short walk through the memorial site.

The purpose of the memorial at Congressional Cemetery is threefold. First, as a cemetery, it was a logical place to memorialize. And the trees were especially fitting for the cemetery, fitting into its memorial tradition of the use of cenotaphs, or empty tombs. The second reason is because the memorial helps in creating a renewed awareness of the cemetery, to bring more people onto the site, thus continuing the tradition of a cemetery as a gathering space. The third reason for placing the memorial grove within the cemetery was to be part of a landscape plan to re-tree the cemetery.

At the entrance to the grove is a maker containing a poem entitled, “Remembrance”.  It reads,

“For those who no longer hear noisy leaves
shimmering in the summer breeze …
For those who might have sought shelter from the
mid-day sun under a nave of gnarled hornbeams …
For those who would grieve in the quiet space
amid a grove of flowering trees …
For those who perished on September 11, 2001.”

The September 11th Memorial Grove at the cemetery is the first of a series of nine memorial groves planned for the city, with one central and eight ward-based neighborhood memorial tree groves created both to remember September 11 and to celebrate the community that surrounds it.  So I guess I know where I can go on the next eight anniversaries of that terrible day.

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[Click on the photos above to view the full size versions]

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A Titan Arum (Corpse Flower)

In this blog I usually write about the rides I take during my lunch breaks during the workweek.  But sometimes the destination of a ride necessitates going on a weekend.  That was the case for this ride, because I was going to go see a rare and unique amorphophallus titanum, also known as the titan arum, but most commonly referred to as a corpse flower, which is getting ready to bloom at the United States Botanic Garden (USBG), located at 100 Maryland Avenue (MAP) in the southwest area of the Downtown neighborhood in D.C.   It is predicted to bloom sometime between today and Tuesday, and when it happens the bloom will last only 24 to 48 hours before it quickly collapses.  So I didn’t want to wait until next week and possibly miss it.

It is the first bloom of this particular plant, which is six years old.  When it first went on display on July 22nd, the plant was only three and a half feet tall.  But since that time it has grown as much as eight inches in just one day.  In the past 12 days this magnificent specimen has grown an incredible four feet three inches, and is now over seven feet tall.

The blooming of a Titan Arum is rare because does not have an annual or even cyclical blooming process.  The time period between flowerings is unpredictable, and can span from a few years to a few decades.  And there have been only 192 recorded instances of cultivated bloomings since records began.  And because the gigantic flower is native to only the rainforests of Sumatra, Indonesia, it is even more rare to be able to see a bloom in the United States.  The plant is also unique because when it is at peak bloom it possesses an odor that many say smells like the rotting flesh of an animal carcass, with its putrid smell being most potent at night into the early morning.

Some people travel around the world hoping to see one at the moment it flowers.  For botanists and the public, being “in the right place at the right time” to see one of these magnificent plants in bloom can be an once-in-a-lifetime treat. But for me, I was able to see one bloom here at the Botanic Garden in 2013, so this will be the second time I’ve been fortunate enough to see one bloom.  So if you’re able to, I highly recommend a trip to the Botanic Garden to see this natural wonder.  However, if you’re unable to make it here, you can still check it out online at the livestream provided by the USBG.

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[Click on the thumbnails above to view the full size photos]

UDATE (08/02/2016):  The Corpse Flower bloom began to open this morning, and should be in its full, odiferous bloom by the end of the day.  The Botanic Garden will be extending their hours today until 11:00pm.

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UPDATE (08/05/2016):  The Corpse Flower has collapsed.

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The Peaking of the Cherry Blossoms

The blooming of the Yoshino cherry tree blossoms surrounding the Tidal Basin is anticipated by many people in much the same way that small children anticipate the arrival of Santa at Christmastime. The beautiful blooms of the cherry blossom are looked forward to all winter because they are one of the surest and most celebrated signs of spring. But the peak blooming period varies from year to year. In fact, it can vary by over a month. Unseasonably warm or cool temperatures have resulted in peak bloom as early as March 15.  That occurred in 1990.  And they have peaked as late as April 18, as happened in 1958, according to the National Park Service.

Now, I’m fortunate in that I live in the D.C. area and can see them whenever they arrive. But if you live outside of the area and want to see this springtime spectacular, how do you know when the best time to plan to travel here is? Well, much like the weather, you have to rely on predictions for when the peak of the blooming process will occur.

The point at which the cherry blossoms are at their peak is the date on which 70 percent of the area’s Yoshino cherry blossoms are open. But leading up to this, there are several developmental stages that precede full bloom which the trees go through to reach that point. Many amateur cherry blossom watchers eagerly monitor these stages to try and predict when the peak will be. However, responsibility for the official prediction falls to the National Park Service’s Chief Horticulturalist for the National Capital Region, Robert DeFeo. Each year in early March, Mr. DeFeo announces when peak bloom is most likely to occur around the Tidal Basin. He reads nature’s clues at each stage of the process, meticulously follows the weather forecasts, and then ventures out on a limb with an educated guess.

A brief walk through the stages of the process may be helpful in understanding what Mr. DeFeo and others consider in making their predictions. The first sign of their imminent arrival are when green buds emerge on the trees’ branches. This occurs even before the leaves begin to appear on the trees. In the second stage, florets begin to appear, and then extend themselves from the buds. This occurs anywhere between 12 and 17 days before peak bloom. The third stage in the process is referred to as peduncle elongation. But this is not as complexly scientific as the name makes it sound. Peduncle elongation simply means that the small stalk connecting each bloom to the tree’s branch grows. When this occurs, the blooms are almost certain to blossom in at least five days, but not more than ten days. The next-to-last stage in the blooming process is when the blossoms begin to get puffy, signaling that there are just four to six days to peak bloom. And then, finally, the peak bloom stage arrives.

However, demonstrating how inexact and subject to change the predictions are for when D.C.’s cherry blossoms will reach their peak, this year’s original prediction, issued on March 2nd and predicting the peak to occur between March 31st and April 3rd, had to be revised. Cooler temperatures than what had been previously forecast resulted in the prediction being revised less than a week after it was originally made. The revised forecast is now for this year’s peak bloom to occur between last Thursday (March 18th), and this Wednesday (March 23rd). That meant today should have been right in the middle of the cherry blossoms peak bloom time.

So on today’s lunchtime bike ride I decided to ride to the Tidal Basin to enjoy the spring spectacle. But I ended up feeling like someone who took an umbrella with me because I listened to a weatherman’s prediction for thunderstorms, but then I didn’t see a drop of rain. The cherry blossoms around the Tidal Basin are nowhere near their peak. They are making steady process. But they seem to be taking their time.

The National Park Service has narrowed its most recent prediction, estimating the peak to occur this Wednesday or Thursday.  But from what I observed today, I’d estimate that the majority of the blooms are in the peduncle elongation stage, with peak bloom still potentially ten days away.  With warmer weather arriving soon, and then rain predicted for this weekend, I guess this year we will have to just wait and see what happens.

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Stages of Development
1 – Green Buds   2 – Florets Visible   3 – Peduncle Elongation
4 – Puffy White   5 – Peak Bloom

[Click on the thumbnails above to view the full size, high resolution photos]

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Temperatures warm enough to shed winter jackets, the Washington Nationals playing in Space Coast Stadium in Viera, Florida, and setting the clocks ahead like we did this past weekend are all signs that springtime in our nation’s capital is on the horizon.  Another sure sign of spring’s imminent arrival is when the dark spindly trees lining The Tidal Basin begin sprouting their green buds, hinting of the florets that will soon become the world-famous pale pink or white cherry blossoms that annually attract so many visitors to the city during the first weeks of spring.

I look forward to the coming days when I will be fortunate enough to be able to watch the blooming process unfold.  It is expected that the blooms will peak this year between this Friday (March 18th) and next Wednesday (March 23rd), which because of recent unseasonably warm weather is earlier than initially thought.  So although the National Cherry Blossom Festival doesn’t begin until a week from today (March 20th) and runs through April 18th, this coming weekend will be the ideal time to experience this year’s phenomenon.

So whether you for opt for an outing to the Tidal Basin and National Mall area, the tree-lined streets of East Potomac Park and Hains Point, or the diversity and variety of species of cherry trees at the National Arboretum, don’t put it off for very long.  Because the visual splendor of these delicate cherry blooms is given to us, unfortunately, for only a brief time, leading many to say that they are symbolic and serve to remind us of the beauty and brevity of life itself.

(Note: Click here or on the above photo to enlarge it and see the photo in such detail that you’ll be able to see both antennae of a small bug peaking over the branch above the buds.)

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Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge

On this three-day Columbus Day holiday weekend I ventured to the outer areas of the D.C. metro area, where I visited the Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, which is located approximately 25 miles due south of the city, at 13950 Dawson Beach Road (MAP), where the Occoquan River meets the Potomac River in Woodbridge, Virginia .

Up until the 1940’s, the site was a popular tourist spot known as Dawson Beach. Then in 1950 the U.S. Army purchased the site. Named Harry Diamond Laboratories, the Army initially used the area for a radio transmitting station. In the 1970s, the base’s mission shifted to top secret research. Electromagnetic pulse testing and sight lines for security kept the vegetation low, primarily in grasslands. The base was eventually closed in the 1990s, and ownership of the 644-acre site was transferred to the Department of the Interior’s United States Fish and Wildlife Service.

Originally referred to as the Marumsco National Wildlife Refuge, the refuge was officially established in 1998 and renamed the Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge.   Today it consists of a mix of wetlands, native grasslands and forest areas that provide a diversity of habitats for wide variety of species. The wetland habitats cover about half of the refuge and include wet meadows, bottomland hardwoods, open freshwater marsh, and tidally influenced marshes and streams. Upland meadows and mature forest comprised mostly of oak, hickory and beech trees are interspersed among the wetlands.

The unusual number and interspersion of habitats provides visitors an opportunity to view a wide variety of wildlife species and habitats in a relatively small area. The plant diversity of this refuge is outstanding in that over 650 plant species are known to be present. The refuge also boasts being able to documented over 220 different types of birds which are either native to the area or are migratory birds passing through, many of which are uncommon or rare in the region.

The refuge has approximately four miles of old roads are reserved for foot traffic, overlapping among three circular routes. It also has two miles of roads which are reserved for motor vehicle and bicycle access. Information is posted at the visitor contact station and at trail heads.

The highlights for me included seeing white tailed deer, a red fox, a turkey, more than a dozen rabbits, wood ducks, migratory geese, painted turtles and a nesting bald eagle.  As much as I enjoyed seeing all of the wildlife, it made me sorry that I only had my cell phone with which to take photographs. On my next visit I will definitely be taking along a good camera.

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[Click on the thumbnails above to view the full size photos]